Susan’s Story – Part One

Synopsis

 

Susan’s Story is about an African American police officer who’s having a rough time in life. She’s been burned by an ex-lover and is dealing with the recent death of her beloved brother. As time progresses, she becomes more and more isolated and lonely. Then she meets the mysterious Renata. She is inexplicably drawn to the woman, and they engage in a heated one-night-stand.

 

Susan is certain she’ll never see the sexually charged goddess again, but a fated encounter brings them back together. Renata, who is also Mistress Lucia, will not only show Susan that being all tied up might just set her heart free, but also open up a world of sexual possibilities she never considered.

Susan's Story - Part One

Officer Susan Riley was supposed to be off duty, but they’d gotten a last-minute call to check out a disturbance in a small inner-city skate park.


By the time they’d arrived, the perps vandalizing the skate park had scattered away like cockroaches being chased after the light switch had been flipped. One had been cornered, frozen in fear when he couldn’t clear the chain link fence. He stood shivering in the cold night air.


“Just cuff him and read him his rights,” Officer Schwartz had said.


Susan inhaled slowly to maintain her calm.


The kid couldn’t be older than sixteen. Worst case scenario, it had been a hazing ceremony to induct him into their gang – best case, bored, neglected teens looking for mischief.


There were gangs in Vegas, but if this were a ‘gang’ it was like little kids playing pretend. Trying on their father’s shoes that were three sizes too big and stumbling around awkwardly.


She grabbed the kid and pulled him aside. The kid looked as though he were of mixed ethnicity. Maybe African American and Latino.  He probably had little support from either side. She could relate, being full African American, and a woman in a man’s profession. His plain white t-shirt was threadbare, and his jean cuffs rose above the ankles.


“What’s your name, kid?” Susan asked.


The kid cast a sidelong glance at her, then looked away quickly. His eyes were shimmering with the threat of unwanted tears.


“What the hell are you doing, Susan?” Schwartz asked.


Susan turned slightly, her voice calm but laced slightly with a menacing warning. “Give – me – a minute.”


Schwartz rolled his eyes and walked back to the patrol car.


“Okay, you don’t wanna give me your name, it’s fine. I’m going to have to lock ya up until your legal counsel arrives. That could take a while.”


The kid’s eyes widened. “How long?” He asked.


“Hard to say. It’s been busy these days, and there’s only so many public defenders to go round,” Susan said.


She knew full well there wouldn’t be a need for a public defender, but shaking him up a bit would get him talking. Get her the info she needed to help him. He was probably a minor. It was likely a first offense. She had a knack for being able to tell.


“It’s Tyrone,” he said quietly.


“How old are you, Tyrone?” Susan asked.

 

“Fifteen,” then, as an afterthought, “ma’am.”


Susan’s heart sank. This kid was the classic case, wanting to fit in, poor and broken family, looking for a place to belong in a landscape fraught with smoke and mirrors.

“Your mama know where you are? What you out here doing?” Susan asked.


His gaze was diverted towards the ground. He shook his head no.


“Let me ask you something, Tyrone? You really think spray painting up all this public property at a city park is going to make you fit in? Look at your homies man, they up and left you cold, once the brass showed up.”


Anger flitted across Tyrone’s face, and he pursed his lips tight.


“They don’t care ‘bout you. You wanna fit in. There’s better ways to do that than defacing public property.”


Tyrone rolled his eyes but was careful not to be direct about it.


“C’mon, turn around. I gotta cuff you.”


The tears did leak from the corner of his eyes then. Susan frog marched him to the car. Schwartz took over and roughly jostled the boy into the back of the car. Susan’s nostrils flared as she glared at Schwartz’s back.


“Took you long enough, Riley. What were you doing, preaching him a Sunday sermon to save his soul,” Schwartz snickered.


It was Susan’s turn to roll her eyes. She was careful to look out the window so Schwartz wouldn’t see her.


When they got back to the precinct, Susan told Schwartz she’d take care of the boy, and he happily made his way to the break room for coffee. Vegas nights in the winter were colder than most people realized, and he was all too happy to warm up with a cup of brew and leave the hoodlum to be Susan’s problem.


When they got into the station, Susan sat Tyrone down on a chair in a holding room until the social worker and juvenile authorities took over. It would take them a while to get there. She took off his cuffs and set a soda down on the table.


“You thirsty?”


He looked away as she pulled a chair up directly across from the boy and sat down. She pushed the Coke towards him.


“Aren’t you putting me in a cell?” Tyrone asked, rolling his eyes.


There would be no jail cell. Because he was a minor, it meant he’d be dealt with differently than an adult. At the moment, there was no reason he needed to know that though.


“Let’s chat a bit. I wanna know why you got it in your head that tonight’s little farce was such a good idea.”


Again a roll of the eyes. This time directly at her.


“Look, you don’t have to talk to me. I get it. I’m a cop. We’re the bad guys. But I got news for you, Ty. I ain’t no guy.”


He cast a glance at her then, and a hint of a smile cracked.


“So, let me ask you this. Gonna be direct. Was it initiation?”


Tyrone shrugged and looked away.


Susan needed to know if they were just a bunch of kids being stupid or if this kid was trying to induct himself into a low-level gang. The answer would make a huge difference.


“You trying to join a gang, Tyrone?” She pressed.


“Just some guys from school.”


“Are these guys in a gang?”

 

“No.” He looked down and seemed embarrassed to admit this.


Inwardly, Susan breathed a sigh of relief.


“Why you wanna be hanging out with homies who gonna ditch you like that Ty? First sign of heat and they threw you right under the bus.”


Tyrone’s face hardened.


Susan pulled the Coke towards her, cracked it open, and pushed it back towards the boy.


He glanced at the can indecisively. She knew why he was hesitant. The offering, if taken, was an unspoken gesture of trust. If he took and drank from it, he’d feel like he was giving in –  trusting the enemy.


He tapped his fingers nervously on the table and finally relented. He took the can in a rough gesture, took one swig, and practically slammed it back onto the metal table.


Susan waited. He took a few more sips from the can, and despite the sugar, it seemed to calm him.


“It’s rough out there. I grew up in Oakland. Some shady shit on those streets, man let me tell you.”


Tyrone looked at her cautiously then back to fiddling with the tab on the Coke can.


“I know how hard it can be — no one to lean on, having to take care of yourself. Just need to find someone who understands. It’s easy to get sucked into the game. I almost did.”


His eyes flitted up towards her. “What’d ya do?” Tyrone asked.


“Stealing shit. Did a little time in juvie. It could’a gone real bad for me, but I was lucky Ty. I was real lucky man.”


“I ain’t got no luck.”


“Now you see, I beg to differ. I think you’re luckier than you realize.”


“I got caught. How the fuck is that lucky!”


“True, you got caught. But your ass is luckier than you realize, cause you got caught by me.” Susan smirked and winked at him.


Tyrone snorted a laugh.


It was just the reaction she’d hoped for. There was hope for this one, after all. It was going to be a long night, and she should have been off over an hour ago, but it’s why she became an officer of the law.